Ramadhan 2015

Dundalk Muslim Community wishes to congratulate Muslims on the commencement of the blessed month of Ramadan which is beginning on Thursday 18 June 2015. May Allah (سبحانه وتعالي)bestow upon you all and all your loved ones inner peace, happiness and His perpetual blessings; Ramadan Mubarak. Eisha and Traweeh Prayer will be offered one hour (1h) after the Athan of Maghrib everyday InshaaAllah.

During This Blessing Mounth our all Prayers we will perform in a Former Toy-master Long Walk Dundalk toymaster-long-walk
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Our Brochure

Please download our brochure here. This short leaflet from Dundalk Muslim Community aims to increase the local awareness of the Muslim community, the commonalities we share with our non-Muslim brothers and sisters to allow a better understanding of what being a Muslim in Ireland entails. In doing so we aim to break down barriers and prejudices in order to build good relations at a local level....

Muslim Culture

Muslim Culture It is important to treat Muslims that you meet as individuals. Be sensitive and greet them in a way that is culturally significant to them. It is polite to know how to act around people of a different culture and how to treat them with the utmost respect. How to Greet Muslim Men When approaching a Muslim (a follower of the Prophet Muhammed) it is customary to give the greeting of peace: “Assalamu alaikum.” This greeting has a short meaning of “Peace be upon you,” similar to the Jewish greeting of “shalom alekum” and the Christian greeting “May the peace of the Lord be upon you.” But assalamu alaikum has a deeper meaning: “May you remain safe from pain, sorrow or harm.” Pronounce the a’s in the greeting “Assalamu alaikum” not as the a in cart, i.e. “ah.” Instead, but as the “a” in “cat.” ...

On Entering a Mosque

On Entering the Mosque Muslims would usually be delighted to show others their place of worship. It is the sharing of what they hold very dear to their heart. It is hoped, however, that the visitors observe certain basic rules of conduct. The term Mosque is commonly used by non-Muslims to define the Muslim place of worship but its correct name is Masjid and this is the term used by Muslims. It would be preferable for non-Muslims to adapt to this correct terminology. Whether visiting alone, or as a group, it is important to follow the guidelines for clothing and behaviour so as not to cause offence. For groups, it is important not to talk loudly, thus disturbing anyone who may be at prayer. If any group members have special needs, let the place being visited know in advance so that they can prepare to help. For example, although the custom of the Mosque is to sit on t...

What type of food can Muslim people eat?

Dietary laws for Muslims are very clear. As outlined in the Qur’an (the “bible” for Muslims), Muslims are forbidden from consuming pork, alcohol, blood, meat dedicated to false gods, etc. The meat must be slaughtered in a “Halal” way i.e by saying “Bism-Allah”(in the name of Allah) before slaughtering the animal. All food that is allowed to be eaten by Muslims is called halal. What are the main laws or beliefs relating to food? Eating is a matter of faith in Islam. Muslim dietary practise is fundamentally about obeying God. All practising Muslim believers obey God Almighty by eating the allowed foods (halal) and avoiding the forbidden foods (haram) which are mentioned in the Qur’an and in the sayings of the final prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him). The following are a list of Muslim dietary practises. Muslims follow these because it is God’s word...

whoever relieves a believer's distress of the stressful aspects of this world, Allah will rescue him from a difficulty of the difficulties of the hereafter.